Beer or Wine, Who in Europe Drinks what?

National Stereotypes may seem funny and be the butt of many a joke, but more often than not, they are based on a simple grain of truth. In the case of alcohol, the widely held belief is the French drink wine, the Germans drink beer and the Brits just drink far too much, of anything. But is this true? How do the nations stack up against each other in comparison? Who drinks what?

Clever chap Jakub Marian, using data from a study by the World Health Organisation on global alcohol consumption, has created two maps that show how much beer and wine we consume country-by-country in litres per year, per capita. The findings were, well, not entirely surprising:

Beer

Beer consumption Map

As the map shows, the biggest beer-lovers reside in the Czech Republic (149), Germany (106) and Austria (108). We drink on average 69 litres per year (69, titter!), putting us in the pack.

Montenegro have a pretty pitiful consumption, in at just eleven litres per capita, followed by Albania (20) and in the only real surprise, Italy (29). Guess they export all the Peroni (although go and check out some of the amazing Italian craft brewers)

Wine

Wine consumption map

Wine is popular with the all the usual culprits: although surprisingly Portugal lead France in wine-drinking with 55 and 53 litres per capita respectively, followed by little Andorra (48) Denmark, Slovenia and Croatia (all with 42). Unsurprisingly, the Germans don’t seem too keen on wine, drinking a mere 25 litres per year, and Lithuania and Estonia only eleven.

So with us Brits coming in at a low 30 for wine, and a comfortable 69 for beer, maybe it is time to dispel the well-established idea that we drink far too much: in fact it seems we are lagging behind in comparison to the rest of Europe. So, depending on your viewpoint of this piece of news you can raise a glass to our apparent self-restraint or take it as a challenge to get us back up that league and raise several glasses. At the same time.

Based on an Indy100 article from independent.co.uk. Read the original here.